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The cuisine of Iceland

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Capital Eastern Northeastern Northwestern SouthernPeninsula Southern Western Westfjords
The foods of Iceland
The roots of Iceland’s cuisine come from the Scandinavian cuisine after Norse Vikings settled here during the 9th century and onwards.
In the past, resources in Iceland were few and far between; the lack of sunlight severely limited fishing and hunting options, and the island’s isolation under the Arctic Circle made the importation of goods and food items difficult at best.
For centuries, therefore, Icelanders maintained a simple diet that reflected the harsh natural circumstances in which they struggled to survive.
However, the key elements of the Icelandic diet have changed very little since the country’s settlement over a thousand years ago, with the most popular dishes still being fish, lamb and the Icelandic skyr. Skyr is an Icelandic dairy product, and it’s been a provision of Icelanders for nearly 1,000 years.
Considering the lack of ingredients in Iceland, with the land being barren and infertile, Icelanders have always had to get creative when it comes to cooking.
Although it is not eaten quite as much today, dried stockfish using fresh fish, mainly haddock, Atlantic wolffish or cod remains one of the most popular dishes of the old Icelandic tradition.
Along with the fish, sheep have been the lifeblood of this nation since its arrival with the Vikings.Still today you can find traditionally cured meat in grocery stores and restaurants
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